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Drupal Association News: Meeting Personas: The Skilled Drupal User

Drupal News - December 17, 2014 - 12:00pm

This post is part of an ongoing series detailing the new personas that have been drawn up as part of our Drupal.org user research.

Chris Ohmstede is based out of Los Angeles, California. An experienced programmer, Chris is new to Drupal but already identifies as a skilled persona. Several months ago, Chris discovered Drupal as he was looking for solutions to build a website for hosting a program he wrote.

"I spent a number of years in the banking industry, and in that industry banks are constantly making connections to everything. I was always running in to problems when things couldn’t connect— it was always an issue trying to figure out what was actually going on. Over the years, I wrote a bunch of applets here and there to figure out what the problems were, and my program whycanticonnect is a conglomeration of those applets that work across operating systems, mobile— I’ve got cloud services approaching me about it, too.

Wanted: Custom Functionality

“Originally, I was hosting my project for download using a different CMS option, but things weren't working properly. Finally, I hit a point where I said “I’ve got to make a change.” I initially went to Drupal because I use Linux as my OS, and Drupal is one of the only CMSs available out of the repositories. I saw that, went and did some research, and Drupal looked big and well organized. One of the cool things that caught my attention is that I could Google around and see that everything I needed was already built. I never had to ask for any help — I was able to roll on through and put my site together easily."

“Also, one of the reasons why I selected Drupal was that I've released my product in 12 different languages, and Drupal looks like it has some decent translation services coming in. I want my site to be usable in all 12 languages I support."

After downloading Drupal, Chris relied on his technical knowledge to carry him through. Though he initially encountered some difficulty getting the modules to do what he wanted, he found after some searching that deriving his theme would fix his problems.

"Once I derived the theme, everything got easier— the way drupal derives themes is perfect. It’s very object oriented, which is fantastic. The nice thing about Drupal was that I could figure out what I wanted to mess with, and I could build variables on the local scope and carry them through the whole page and process, which is surprisingly difficult to do with other systems."

"It gives me everything I need"

“The great thing about Drupal is that you're not limited in how to inject code,” said Chris. "I like my download module because it gives me everything I need. It figures out intelligently what’s the best download to go with, it builds a link and launches the javalaunch, so it’ll work whether java is enabled or not— which was a problem I’d had before. I’m very happy with it, and very happy with Drupal."

For the time being, Chris doesn’t plan to put together more Drupal sites — rather, he’s going to focus on maintaining the one he has.

"I have no desire to become a web designer,” Chris said. “I built my site because I know I'll need to change it often, and with Drupal it doesn’t cost me anything. As far as giving back to the community, I’m mostly focused on working with my product. I need to write an Android, Mac, and iOS version. I’m planning on submitting some of my modules to Drupal.org once I’ve got them in shape, and I’ve made posts for people asking the same questions and encountering the same problem as I have. Maybe someday down the road I’ll have time to do more, though I certainly wouldn’t make any promises about it."

Personal blog tags: drupal.org user researchpersona interviews

Drupal core announcements: Global Sprint Weekend 17-18 January 2015, Small local sprints good for first time organizers

Drupal News - December 17, 2014 - 10:10am

Global #SprintWeekend will be 17-18 January 2015.

Please encourage contributors you know to host a small local sprint near them.

Post an announcement in your local meetup groups please; ask if anyone is interested in hosting a sprint and wants some support organizing it.

List sprints on the wiki: https://groups.drupal.org/node/447258
That wiki also has more information about organizing a sprint.

We will have a couple meetings to support organizers (doodle for organizer support meetings: http://doodle.com/uutcp2ge7gt3a8ed )
and also have mentors in irc over the sprint days (doodle for mentoring during the sprint: http://doodle.com/5vr54mpvxq4k7x29 ).

Zengenuity: DrupalCamp Michigan 2015: January 31 at Henry Ford College

Drupal News - December 17, 2014 - 4:49am

Attention Michigan Drupalers! Mark your calendars for DrupalCamp Michigan, Saturday January 31 at Henry Ford College in Dearborn. For only $15, you get a full day of Drupal presentations, discussions and lunch!

Online registration/tickets will be available soon, and we’re currently accepting session proposals. If you’ve got an interesting presentation to share, please post it to the website here: http://2015camp.michigandrupal.com. Session selections will be made in early January.

Interested is sponsoring the camp and getting your name out to the local Drupal community? Sponsorship information is available here: http://2015camp.michigandrupal.com/sponsors.

Code Karate: Drupal 7 PRLP: An easier way to resetting Drupal passwords

Drupal News - December 17, 2014 - 4:40am
Episode Number: 187

The Password Reset Landing Page or PRLP module is honestly one of the simplest modules you have come across. The sole purpose of the module is to provide the ability for users who request a new password to be able to reset their password on the password reset landing page instead of having to do so on the user edit page.

Tags: DrupalDrupal 7Drupal PlanetEmailSite Administration

Code Drop: Upgrade Path: Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 using the Migrate API - Video Demo

Drupal News - December 17, 2014 - 12:57am

It's the final week of work before Christmas and Code Drop have sponsored me to work on core for the whole week :). I've been working towards a successful end to end migration from Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 and after debugging 5 core bugs, I finally have a working solution. Checkout the video!

The video shows an out the box Drupal 6 website with a bunch of fields, taxonomies and settings created. Most of the stuff comes across to Drupal 8 but there are still a few issues that need work.

Current Core Bugs

These are the core bugs that are required to get this demo working.

Meeting Personas: The Drupal Learner

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 7:58pm

 This post is part of an ongoing series detailing the new personas that have been drawn up as part of our Drupal.org user research.

In April of 2014, the Japanese Drupal community gathered in Kyoto for their first ever DrupalCamp. Individuals came from other countries to attend the conference, and that was how Keiko Kanda was first introduced to the project.

“I think it might be a bit unusual to get involved the way I did,” Keiko said. “My cousin who lives in Sydney, Australia, married an Australian man. He came to Japan to attend the DrupalCamp in Kyoto and he asked me to accompany him… though some people were presenting in English, he was concerned that he might need a translator.”

“I knew almost nothing about Drupal, even though he had introduced me to what he was working on at that time. But I thought, I would be glad if I could help him out. So I went to the DrupalCamp in Kyoto and it turned out to be a very interesting experience for me.”

“To be perfectly honest with you, when I decided to tag along with my cousin’s husband, Colin Watson, I didn’t realize how fun it would be. I never thought my involvement would last this long,” Keiko said.

Serving an Immediate Need

At the camp, Keiko quickly found herself enlisted as a translator for some of the sessions, and was surprised by the number of foreign attendees at the conference.

“They were all very nice people, and there was much more international attendance than I expected. There were maybe fifteen or twenty international attendees there, and probably ten or fewer were giving presentations in English. Some were able to give parts of their Drupal explanations in Japanese, but they needed a translator to help introduce themselves. So when I arrived at the venue, the camp organizer asked me to translate the introductions from English to Japanese."

That was how Keiko met Chris Luckhardt, a Drupal Master that we will hear from later in the week.

"Chris was one of the speakers... though he had another translator to translate the technical parts of his presentation, when he spoke about himself and other innocent, casual stuff, he needed someone to translate. So that's how I got involved."

Stayed For the Community

"After the Drupal camp in Kyoto, the organizers — Satoshi Kino and Kyoto Ohtagaki — they asked me to do the translation stuff not only at DrupalCamp but at the meet-ups and meetings. According to them, many Japanese Drupal developers can understand when they read English, but when they have something to express it’s very hard to write or speak whole thing in English.

"Kino-san says it’s hard for Japanese developers to catch up with the latest information on Drupal.org,” Keiko continued, “So he and some other Japanese community members are trying to translate some of the useful English information into Japanese, though it takes time.

"I was — still am — studying to be a translator,” Keiko added, "and I thought it would be a good experience for me to help them. But many of Drupal technical terms... for me, they are gibberish. It’s not a language problem, it’s a problem with Drupal technical terms. So even though at DrupalCamp Kyoto they were talking in Japanese, I often couldn’t understand what they were talking about."

"I refer to Drupal.org occasionally when the community members talk about something very complicated— something about Drupal or what they were doing with Drupal… [translation is] hard for me but it’s fun, and in the process I can learn not only Drupal technical terms, but also what is going on in the Drupal world, learn about the problems the Drupal Japanese community has, and so on."

Ways of Mastering Drupal

When it comes to her current work with Drupal, Keiko is more focused on supporting the CMS than using it.

“When Kino-san organizes Drupal meetings, like monthly meetings, he will post the venue and time and date on Facebook in Japanese, and I will translate that into English and spread the word. When Kino-san or Kyoto-san works with Chris [or other English-speaking Drupal users], I facilitate the meeting on Skype. Though they understand English, it is hard for them to speak in English so I translate from Japanese to English for them."

Keiko has plans to help with translating quite a bit of technical material in the future. She has already agreed to assist Chris Luckhardt with translating a Drupal 8 tutorial video into Japanese, and has volunteered to help translate several books as well. In the meantime, she wishes there was a better way to get ahold of other translators like herself.

“I’m not sure because I’ve never thoroughly searched around Drupal.org, but it would be great if there were resources for people who aren't developers,” Keiko said. “I wish there was a better way to find translators, or event organizers— maybe people who don't create websites but instead help to build the project and the community — not only local communities but worldwide communities too. It would be good if there was a place I could go to find people with experience that might be helpful when organizing DrupalCamps, DrupalCons, and Drupal meetups."

Finding a Common Vocabulary

Keiko has a few other pain points, but they mostly revolve around language.

“As a community member, I think so many challenges I have, are… well, first I’m trying to understand what other community members are talking about as accurately, correctly as I can. That’s the first challenge. And I’m trying to learn more Drupal technical terms so that I can understand people's conversations more easily, but oftentimes… it might appear to be an innocent conversation, but behind the ordinary conversation sometimes there are subtexts… you imagine that someone is talking about an innocent topic but when you try to read between the lines there are implications of bigger problems they have.

“For instance, many people in the Japanese Drupal community are spending incredible amounts of time trying to understand what’s written on Drupal.org, because it’s written in English. It’s my impression — and it might be wrong — that the Japanese Drupal community falls into one of two categories: either they catch up with latest information using Drupal.org frequently, or they are totally left behind, staying within only Japanese-written world, because it is so difficult to read English.

"It’s my impression and opinion too that the Japanese community members are trying to attract more people who maybe did not have anything to do with Drupal, but are good with English. For me, I would be happy to find someone who speaks English and Japanese better than I do... the workload can be overwhelming sometimes, but if I could share the task for someone, that would be very helpful for me. "

Drupal Association News: Meeting Personas: The Drupal Learner

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 7:58pm

In April of 2014, the Japanese Drupal community gathered in Kyoto for their first ever DrupalCamp. Individuals came from other countries to attend the conference, and that was how Keiko Kanda was first introduced to the project.

“I think it might be a bit unusual to get involved the way I did,” Keiko said. “My cousin who lives in Sydney, Australia, married an Australian man. He came to Japan to attend the DrupalCamp in Kyoto and he asked me to accompany him… though some people were presenting in English, he was concerned that he might need a translator.”

“I knew almost nothing about Drupal, even though he had introduced me to what he was working on at that time. But I thought, I would be glad if I could help him out. So I went to the DrupalCamp in Kyoto and it turned out to be a very interesting experience for me.”

“To be perfectly honest with you, when I decided to tag along with my cousin’s husband, Colin Watson, I didn’t realize how fun it would be. I never thought my involvement would last this long,” Keiko said.

Serving an Immediate Need

At the camp, Keiko quickly found herself enlisted as a translator for some of the sessions, and was surprised by the number of foreign attendees at the conference.

“They were all very nice people, and there was much more international attendance than I expected. There were maybe fifteen or twenty international attendees there, and probably ten or fewer were giving presentations in English. Some were able to give parts of their Drupal explanations in Japanese, but they needed a translator to help introduce themselves. So when I arrived at the venue, the camp organizer asked me to translate the introductions from English to Japanese."

That was how Keiko met Chris Luckhardt, a Drupal Master that we will hear from later in the week.

"Chris was one of the speakers... though he had another translator to translate the technical parts of his presentation, when he spoke about himself and other innocent, casual stuff, he needed someone to translate. So that's how I got involved."

Stayed For the Community

"After the Drupal camp in Kyoto, the organizers — Satoshi Kino and Kyoto Ohtagaki — they asked me to do the translation stuff not only at DrupalCamp but at the meet-ups and meetings. According to them, many Japanese Drupal developers can understand when they read English, but when they have something to express it’s very hard to write or speak whole thing in English.

"Kino-san says it’s hard for Japanese developers to catch up with the latest information on Drupal.org,” Keiko continued, “So he and some other Japanese community members are trying to translate some of the useful English information into Japanese, though it takes time.

"I was — still am — studying to be a translator,” Keiko added, "and I thought it would be a good experience for me to help them. But many of Drupal technical terms... for me, they are gibberish. It’s not a language problem, it’s a problem with Drupal technical terms. So even though at DrupalCamp Kyoto they were talking in Japanese, I often couldn’t understand what they were talking about."

"I refer to Drupal.org occasionally when the community members talk about something very complicated— something about Drupal or what they were doing with Drupal… [translation is] hard for me but it’s fun, and in the process I can learn not only Drupal technical terms, but also what is going on in the Drupal world, learn about the problems the Drupal Japanese community has, and so on."

Ways of Mastering Drupal

When it comes to her current work with Drupal, Keiko is more focused on supporting the CMS than using it.

“When Kino-san organizes Drupal meetings, like monthly meetings, he will post the venue and time and date on Facebook in Japanese, and I will translate that into English and spread the word. When Kino-san or Kyoto-san works with Chris [or other English-speaking Drupal users], I facilitate the meeting on Skype. Though they understand English, it is hard for them to speak in English so I translate from Japanese to English for them."

Keiko has plans to help with translating quite a bit of technical material in the future. She has already agreed to assist Chris Luckhardt with translating a Drupal 8 tutorial video into Japanese, and has volunteered to help translate several books as well. In the meantime, she wishes there was a better way to get ahold of other translators like herself.

“I’m not sure because I’ve never thoroughly searched around Drupal.org, but it would be great if there were resources for people who aren't developers,” Keiko said. “I wish there was a better way to find translators, or event organizers— maybe people who don't create websites but instead help to build the project and the community — not only local communities but worldwide communities too. It would be good if there was a place I could go to find people with experience that might be helpful when organizing DrupalCamps, DrupalCons, and Drupal meetups."

Finding a Common Vocabulary

Keiko has a few other pain points, but they mostly revolve around language.

“As a community member, I think so many challenges I have, are… well, first I’m trying to understand what other community members are talking about as accurately, correctly as I can. That’s the first challenge. And I’m trying to learn more Drupal technical terms so that I can understand people's conversations more easily, but oftentimes… it might appear to be an innocent conversation, but behind the ordinary conversation sometimes there are subtexts… you imagine that someone is talking about an innocent topic but when you try to read between the lines there are implications of bigger problems they have.

“For instance, many people in the Japanese Drupal community are spending incredible amounts of time trying to understand what’s written on Drupal.org, because it’s written in English. It’s my impression — and it might be wrong — that the Japanese Drupal community falls into one of two categories: either they catch up with latest information using Drupal.org frequently, or they are totally left behind, staying within only Japanese-written world, because it is so difficult to read English.

"It’s my impression and opinion too that the Japanese community members are trying to attract more people who maybe did not have anything to do with Drupal, but are good with English. For me, I would be happy to find someone who speaks English and Japanese better than I do... the workload can be overwhelming sometimes, but if I could share the task for someone, that would be very helpful for me. "

Personal blog tags: drupal.org user researchpersona interviews

Drupal Association News: Meeting Personas: The Drupal Learner

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 7:58pm

In April of 2014, the Japanese Drupal community gathered in Kyoto for their first ever DrupalCamp. Individuals came from other countries to attend the conference, and that was how Keiko Kanda was first introduced to the project.

“I think it might be a bit unusual to get involved the way I did,” Keiko said. “My cousin who lives in Sydney, Australia, married an Australian man. He came to Japan to attend the DrupalCamp in Kyoto and he asked me to accompany him… though some people were presenting in English, he was concerned that he might need a translator.”

“I knew almost nothing about Drupal, even though he had introduced me to what he was working on at that time. But I thought, I would be glad if I could help him out. So I went to the DrupalCamp in Kyoto and it turned out to be a very interesting experience for me.”

“To be perfectly honest with you, when I decided to tag along with my cousin’s husband, Colin Watson, I didn’t realize how fun it would be. I never thought my involvement would last this long,” Keiko said.

Serving an Immediate Need

At the camp, Keiko quickly found herself enlisted as a translator for some of the sessions, and was surprised by the number of foreign attendees at the conference.

“They were all very nice people, and there was much more international attendance than I expected. There were maybe fifteen or twenty international attendees there, and probably ten or fewer were giving presentations in English. Some were able to give parts of their Drupal explanations in Japanese, but they needed a translator to help introduce themselves. So when I arrived at the venue, the camp organizer asked me to translate the introductions from English to Japanese."

That was how Keiko met Chris Luckhardt, a Drupal Master that we will hear from later in the week.

"Chris was one of the speakers... though he had another translator to translate the technical parts of his presentation, when he spoke about himself and other innocent, casual stuff, he needed someone to translate. So that's how I got involved."

Stayed For the Community

"After the Drupal camp in Kyoto, the organizers — Satoshi Kino and Kyoto Ohtagaki — they asked me to do the translation stuff not only at DrupalCamp but at the meet-ups and meetings. According to them, many Japanese Drupal developers can understand when they read English, but when they have something to express it’s very hard to write or speak whole thing in English.

"Kino-san says it’s hard for Japanese developers to catch up with the latest information on Drupal.org,” Keiko continued, “So he and some other Japanese community members are trying to translate some of the useful English information into Japanese, though it takes time.

"I was — still am — studying to be a translator,” Keiko added, "and I thought it would be a good experience for me to help them. But many of Drupal technical terms... for me, they are gibberish. It’s not a language problem, it’s a problem with Drupal technical terms. So even though at DrupalCamp Kyoto they were talking in Japanese, I often couldn’t understand what they were talking about."

"I refer to Drupal.org occasionally when the community members talk about something very complicated— something about Drupal or what they were doing with Drupal… [translation is] hard for me but it’s fun, and in the process I can learn not only Drupal technical terms, but also what is going on in the Drupal world, learn about the problems the Drupal Japanese community has, and so on."

Ways of Mastering Drupal

When it comes to her current work with Drupal, Keiko is more focused on supporting the CMS than using it.

“When Kino-san organizes Drupal meetings, like monthly meetings, he will post the venue and time and date on Facebook in Japanese, and I will translate that into English and spread the word. When Kino-san or Kyoto-san works with Chris [or other English-speaking Drupal users], I facilitate the meeting on Skype. Though they understand English, it is hard for them to speak in English so I translate from Japanese to English for them."

Keiko has plans to help with translating quite a bit of technical material in the future. She has already agreed to assist Chris Luckhardt with translating a Drupal 8 tutorial video into Japanese, and has volunteered to help translate several books as well. In the meantime, she wishes there was a better way to get ahold of other translators like herself.

“I’m not sure because I’ve never thoroughly searched around Drupal.org, but it would be great if there were resources for people who aren't developers,” Keiko said. “I wish there was a better way to find translators, or event organizers— maybe people who don't create websites but instead help to build the project and the community — not only local communities but worldwide communities too. It would be good if there was a place I could go to find people with experience that might be helpful when organizing DrupalCamps, DrupalCons, and Drupal meetups."

Finding a Common Vocabulary

Keiko has a few other pain points, but they mostly revolve around language.

“As a community member, I think so many challenges I have, are… well, first I’m trying to understand what other community members are talking about as accurately, correctly as I can. That’s the first challenge. And I’m trying to learn more Drupal technical terms so that I can understand people's conversations more easily, but oftentimes… it might appear to be an innocent conversation, but behind the ordinary conversation sometimes there are subtexts… you imagine that someone is talking about an innocent topic but when you try to read between the lines there are implications of bigger problems they have.

“For instance, many people in the Japanese Drupal community are spending incredible amounts of time trying to understand what’s written on Drupal.org, because it’s written in English. It’s my impression — and it might be wrong — that the Japanese Drupal community falls into one of two categories: either they catch up with latest information using Drupal.org frequently, or they are totally left behind, staying within only Japanese-written world, because it is so difficult to read English.

"It’s my impression and opinion too that the Japanese community members are trying to attract more people who maybe did not have anything to do with Drupal, but are good with English. For me, I would be happy to find someone who speaks English and Japanese better than I do... the workload can be overwhelming sometimes, but if I could share the task for someone, that would be very helpful for me. "

Personal blog tags: drupal.org user researchpersona interviews

Blink Reaction: Creatin Custom Search Pages with Search404 and Apache Solr Search

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 5:56pm

Imagine somewhere deep in your site that you have a page with the alias:

/how-to-build-drupal-site.

Now, let’s imagine this page is not a link in your site’s menu. Your visitor remembers that they have seen this page on your site and starts typing in the address line:

http://yoursite.com/how-to-make-drupal-site

Drupal Watchdog: The Angry Themer

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 7:38am
Column

Sometimes CSS feels like it stands for “Complete Sh*t Show.”

Lucky for us, there’s a tool to help get our CSS under control. This tool is Sass; Simply Awesome Style Sheets. Well, actually: Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets.

Sass is a preprocessor for CSS. Just like PHP & Drupal create Drupal’s Very Rich and Enhanced Markup™, Sass does the same for CSS, but properly, by taking your .scss (sass) files and turning them into super .css files, with variables, functions, and other fancy powers.

.sass files -> [magic thingie] -> .css

Install Sass

Installing Sass on your machine is straightforward, if you’re not afraid of the terminal. Simply do a "sudo gem install sass".

Boom.

You’re ready to get Sassy.

But if the terminal gives you agita, you can install Sass with a GUI, a complete list can be found on sass-lang.com/install or LiveReload.com.

Here’s a video showing how this process works: http://wdog.it/4/1/video

Setup your Drupal theme


In order to make Sass work in your theme, you need:

  • a Ruby config.rb file, for configuration;
  • a Sass folder for all your Sass files;
  • a CSS folder where all your compiled CSS files will be created.
Say Good-bye to Your CSS Files

First, accept that once you convert your CSS files to Sass, you will never again have to look into the CSS folder.

Your days of fiddling directly with CSS are over, and everything is gonna be OK.

3C Web Services: Creating a Faceted Search View in Drupal

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 6:43am
Faceted Searching is a method that allows a user to apply multiple filters of varying dimensions to a list of items on your website. In this tutorial we'll show you how create basic search facets in Drupal using the Search API module.

Digett: Which Base Theme We Use (and Why)

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 6:34am

There are so many website themes, frameworks and opinions out there ... how do you decide which is the best foundation for your next project?

read more

Drupalize.Me: Embed YouTube Videos with Media and Media Internet Sources

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 6:30am

YouTube is a great service for storing and managing your videos. While this is handy, many people want to be able to display their videos within their own website as well. In this tutorial we'll see how the Media, Media Internet Sources, and Media: YouTube modules can help give you a nice, seamless way to integrate YouTube videos into your site, and give really nice control over how those videos look, along with some built-in media management tools.

Paul Booker: Hiding view records based on the value of a new field

Drupal News - December 16, 2014 - 4:36am
function mymodule_views_query_alter(&$view, &$query) { global $user; if (($view->name === 'coaches') || ($view->name === 'trainers')) { if (!in_array('trainer', $user->roles) && !in_array('admin', $user->roles)) { $view->query->fields['field_data_field_profile_hidden'] = array( 'field' => 'field_profile_hidden_value', 'table' => 'field_data_field_profile_hidden', 'alias' => 'field_data_field_profile_hidden' ); $join = new views_join; $join->table ='field_data_field_profile_hidden'; $join->left_table = 'users'; $join->left_field = 'uid'; $join->field = 'entity_id'; $join->extra = array( 0 => array('field' => 'entity_type', 'value' => 'user'), ); $join->type = "LEFT"; $join->extra_type = 'AND'; $join->adjusted = 'TRUE'; // add the join $view->query->table_queue['field_data_field_profile_hidden'] = array( 'table' => 'field_data_field_profile_hidden', 'num' => 1, 'alias' => 'field_data_field_profile_hidden', 'join' => $join, 'relationship' => 'users' ); $view->query->tables['node']['field_data_field_profile_hidden'] = array( 'count' => 1, 'alias' => 'field_data_field_profile_hidden' ); $view->query->where[2]['conditions'][] = array( 'field' => 'field_profile_hidden_value', 'value' => 0, 'operator' => '=' ); } } } /** * Implements hook_update_N(). */ function mymodule_update_7001(&$sandbox) { $uids = db_select('users', 'u') ->fields('u', array('uid')) ->execute() ->fetchCol(); foreach ($uids as $uid) { db_insert('field_data_field_profile_hidden') ->fields(array( 'entity_type' => 'user', 'bundle' => 'user', 'entity_id' => $uid, 'revision_id' => $uid, 'language' => 'und', 'delta' => 0, 'field_profile_hidden_value' => 0, )) ->execute(); } } Tags:

Code Drop: Thoughts on taking the Acquia Drupal certification exam

Drupal News - December 15, 2014 - 5:52pm

Earlier this week I had the opportunity to be the first developer at Code Drop to sit an exam to become an "Acquia Certified Developer". I managed to clear the exam with the following results:

  • Section 1 - Fundamental Web Development Concepts: 87%
  • Section 2 - Site Building: 87%
  • Section 3 - Front end development (Theming) : 92%
  • Section 4 - Back end development (Coding) : 81%

Like many others who have done the exam, I will briefly run over my experience and thoughts on the whole process.

Tag1 Consulting: yumrepos Puppet Module

Drupal News - December 15, 2014 - 12:12pm

Earlier this year we undertook a project to upgrade a client's infrastructure to all new servers including a migration from old Puppet scripts which were starting to show their age after many years of server and service changes. During this process, we created a new set of Puppet scripts using Hiera to separate configuration data from modules.

read more

Meeting Personas: The Drupal Newcomer

Drupal News - December 15, 2014 - 11:01am

 This post is part of an ongoing series detailing the new personas that have been drawn up as part of our Drupal.org user research.

Bronwen Buswell is a newcomer to Drupal. Based out of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Bronwen works as a Conference and Communications Coordinator at a nonprofit called PEAK Parent Center, which is dedicated to supporting the families of children with disabilities. While Bronwen’s role isn’t technical, she needs to use her company’s website as part of getting her work done.

“We’re federally designated by the US Department of Education, so we try to be a total one-stop shop information and referral center,” Bronwen said. “Families can call us about any situation related to their child, and we will either refer them to the right agency or provide what they need. We’re focused on helping families navigate the education and special education systems, and we serve families with children ages birth through 26, with all sorts of disabilities, including autism, down syndrome, learning disabilities, and so on."

Keeping Up With Technology

In the past few years, PEAK Parent Center’s website became very outdated, and this was a problem. Bronwen’s clients were very dependent on being able to receive assistance over the phone, as many of the resources that the center provides are not readily available online. When updates needed to be made, Bronwen and her company were forced to rely on their tech vendors to make changes to the website, as they were working with a custom solution rather than a CMS.

“Our website was pre-cutting edge, made by local vendors, all in HTML code and SQL database. We had excellent tech vendors who helped us create what we needed, and this was before the CMS options came along so it was really good at first. However, in the past 5 to 6 years, it has gotten really archaic, and we’re super reliant upon our vendors for updating our website. What’s simple in a CMS is complex for us,” Bronwen said.

After doing lots of research and working with the federal government to find the best solution for PEAK Parent Center and other centers like it, Bronwen and her colleagues decided to explore using Drupal to create a site template that could be deployed for PEAK Parent Center  and for other similar centers that it supports across the country.

“We're the technical assistance center for parent centers like ours in a 12 state region,” said Bronwen. “When [Drupal Association Executive Director] Holly Ross was at NTEN we started going to their conferences, which led us to launch a tech leadership initiative where we supported participating parent centers across the nation. As part of that, we got connected with great consultants and thinkers in tech, and we were asked by the US Department of Education to participate in the creation of website templates in 2 content management systems — Wordpress and Drupal — that could be used in other parent centers in the future."

Getting Experienced Assistance

With help from Aaron Pava and Nikki Pava at Alegria Partners, the staff at PEAK Parent Center has been learning to use their new Drupal website. Aaron has advised Bronwen and her colleagues every step of the way, from proposing solutions in the discovery process to walking Bronwen and her coworkers through specific tasks.

Occasionally, Bronwen encounters small problems due to updates or little glitches with distributions, which is why Aaron has encouraged her to get involved and do some training on Drupal. Unfortunately, most of Bronwen’s time is spent trying to get the website ready to launch, as she’s under pressure from the federal government and her board of directors to deploy the new site. Though Bronwen isn’t working on the technical side of the website, she’s busy populating it with content and making sure that it will be a useful tool for her clients.

“What I haven’t done is specific Drupal training,” said Bronwen. “I know about Lynda and Build A Module, but I’ve only had time to do sessions one-on-one with Aaron, for example, ‘Here’s how to upload content in this template.’

"I have learned a lot on Drupal.org, but it’s been primarily through Aaron sending me a link— for example, he’ll send me links about Red Hen since we’re exploring our CRM options— but I haven’t surfed around it much,” Bronwen added.

Areas For Improvement

Bronwen wishes there was a recommended Drupal 101 section on Drupal.org, something that would help content editors like herself learn to use the CMS better, but for now, she is limited to relying on more educated ambassadors for Drupal to point her in the right direction.

“It’s delicate to recommend vendors,” said Bronwen, "but it seems that the community is really powerful, and is certainly one of the most unique aspects that sets Drupal aside from other CMS options. Even a few vendors recommended by the community, or a recommend Drupal 101 lesson where you can go through it, go off and work in Drupal, and come back and get Drupal 201 would be really valuable for me.

“I know that there are local Drupal meet-ups that happen all over the country” Bronwen added. “[One group we talked with] told us that nonprofits can go to these events and say “I need this or that,” and some hardcore Drupal techie will take the work on pro bono. That was another factor that helped draw us to using Drupal — the availability of the community. It would be useful if there was more information on how to tap into those meetups, perhaps, when they’re happening."

Bronwen knows that the Drupal community is really powerful, and considers it one of the most unique aspects that sets Drupal aside from other CMS options. She is excited by the availability of the Drupal community, and is looking forward to interacting with it and working with them as she continues to run and improve PEAK Parent Center’s website.

Drupal Association News: Meeting Personas: The Drupal Newcomer

Drupal News - December 15, 2014 - 11:01am

 This post is part of an ongoing series detailing the new personas that have been drawn up as part of our Drupal.org user research.

Bronwen Buswell is a newcomer to Drupal. Based out of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Bronwen works as a Conference and Communications Coordinator at a nonprofit called PEAK Parent Center, which is dedicated to supporting the families of children with disabilities. While Bronwen’s role isn’t technical, she needs to use her company’s website as part of getting her work done.

“We’re federally designated by the US Department of Education, so we try to be a total one-stop shop information and referral center,” Bronwen said. “Families can call us about any situation related to their child, and we will either refer them to the right agency or provide what they need. We’re focused on helping families navigate the education and special education systems, and we serve families with children ages birth through 26, with all sorts of disabilities, including autism, down syndrome, learning disabilities, and so on."

Keeping Up With Technology

In the past few years, PEAK Parent Center’s website became very outdated, and this was a problem. Bronwen’s clients were very dependent on being able to receive assistance over the phone, as many of the resources that the center provides are not readily available online. When updates needed to be made, Bronwen and her company were forced to rely on their tech vendors to make changes to the website, as they were working with a custom solution rather than a CMS.

“Our website was pre-cutting edge, made by local vendors, all in HTML code and SQL database. We had excellent tech vendors who helped us create what we needed, and this was before the CMS options came along so it was really good at first. However, in the past 5 to 6 years, it has gotten really archaic, and we’re super reliant upon our vendors for updating our website. What’s simple in a CMS is complex for us,” Bronwen said.

After doing lots of research and working with the federal government to find the best solution for PEAK Parent Center and other centers like it, Bronwen and her colleagues decided to explore using Drupal to create a site template that could be deployed for PEAK Parent Center  and for other similar centers that it supports across the country.

“We're the technical assistance center for parent centers like ours in a 12 state region,” said Bronwen. “When [Drupal Association Executive Director] Holly Ross was at NTEN we started going to their conferences, which led us to launch a tech leadership initiative where we supported participating parent centers across the nation. As part of that, we got connected with great consultants and thinkers in tech, and we were asked by the US Department of Education to participate in the creation of website templates in 2 content management systems — Wordpress and Drupal — that could be used in other parent centers in the future."

Getting Experienced Assistance

With help from Aaron Pava and Nikki Pava at Alegria Partners, the staff at PEAK Parent Center has been learning to use their new Drupal website. Aaron has advised Bronwen and her colleagues every step of the way, from proposing solutions in the discovery process to walking Bronwen and her coworkers through specific tasks.

Occasionally, Bronwen encounters small problems due to updates or little glitches with distributions, which is why Aaron has encouraged her to get involved and do some training on Drupal. Unfortunately, most of Bronwen’s time is spent trying to get the website ready to launch, as she’s under pressure from the federal government and her board of directors to deploy the new site. Though Bronwen isn’t working on the technical side of the website, she’s busy populating it with content and making sure that it will be a useful tool for her clients.

“What I haven’t done is specific Drupal training,” said Bronwen. “I know about Lynda and Build A Module, but I’ve only had time to do sessions one-on-one with Aaron, for example, ‘Here’s how to upload content in this template.’

"I have learned a lot on Drupal.org, but it’s been primarily through Aaron sending me a link— for example, he’ll send me links about Red Hen since we’re exploring our CRM options— but I haven’t surfed around it much,” Bronwen added.

Areas For Improvement

Bronwen wishes there was a recommended Drupal 101 section on Drupal.org, something that would help content editors like herself learn to use the CMS better, but for now, she is limited to relying on more educated ambassadors for Drupal to point her in the right direction.

“It’s delicate to recommend vendors,” said Bronwen, "but it seems that the community is really powerful, and is certainly one of the most unique aspects that sets Drupal aside from other CMS options. Even a few vendors recommended by the community, or a recommend Drupal 101 lesson where you can go through it, go off and work in Drupal, and come back and get Drupal 201 would be really valuable for me.

“I know that there are local Drupal meet-ups that happen all over the country” Bronwen added. “[One group we talked with] told us that nonprofits can go to these events and say “I need this or that,” and some hardcore Drupal techie will take the work on pro bono. That was another factor that helped draw us to using Drupal — the availability of the community. It would be useful if there was more information on how to tap into those meetups, perhaps, when they’re happening."

Bronwen knows that the Drupal community is really powerful, and considers it one of the most unique aspects that sets Drupal aside from other CMS options. She is excited by the availability of the Drupal community, and is looking forward to interacting with it and working with them as she continues to run and improve PEAK Parent Center’s website.

Personal blog tags: drupal.org user researchpersona interviews

Drupal Association News: Meeting Personas: The Drupal Newcomer

Drupal News - December 15, 2014 - 11:01am

 This post is part of an ongoing series detailing the new personas that have been drawn up as part of our Drupal.org user research.

Bronwen Buswell is a newcomer to Drupal. Based out of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Bronwen works as a Conference and Communications Coordinator at a nonprofit called PEAK Parent Center, which is dedicated to supporting the families of children with disabilities. While Bronwen’s role isn’t technical, she needs to use her company’s website as part of getting her work done.

“We’re federally designated by the US Department of Education, so we try to be a total one-stop shop information and referral center,” Bronwen said. “Families can call us about any situation related to their child, and we will either refer them to the right agency or provide what they need. We’re focused on helping families navigate the education and special education systems, and we serve families with children ages birth through 26, with all sorts of disabilities, including autism, down syndrome, learning disabilities, and so on."

Keeping Up With Technology

In the past few years, PEAK Parent Center’s website became very outdated, and this was a problem. Bronwen’s clients were very dependent on being able to receive assistance over the phone, as many of the resources that the center provides are not readily available online. When updates needed to be made, Bronwen and her company were forced to rely on their tech vendors to make changes to the website, as they were working with a custom solution rather than a CMS.

“Our website was pre-cutting edge, made by local vendors, all in HTML code and SQL database. We had excellent tech vendors who helped us create what we needed, and this was before the CMS options came along so it was really good at first. However, in the past 5 to 6 years, it has gotten really archaic, and we’re super reliant upon our vendors for updating our website. What’s simple in a CMS is complex for us,” Bronwen said.

After doing lots of research and working with the federal government to find the best solution for PEAK Parent Center and other centers like it, Bronwen and her colleagues decided to explore using Drupal to create a site template that could be deployed for PEAK Parent Center  and for other similar centers that it supports across the country.

“We're the technical assistance center for parent centers like ours in a 12 state region,” said Bronwen. “When [Drupal Association Executive Director] Holly Ross was at NTEN we started going to their conferences, which led us to launch a tech leadership initiative where we supported participating parent centers across the nation. As part of that, we got connected with great consultants and thinkers in tech, and we were asked by the US Department of Education to participate in the creation of website templates in 2 content management systems — Wordpress and Drupal — that could be used in other parent centers in the future."

Getting Experienced Assistance

With help from Aaron Pava and Nikki Pava at Alegria Partners, the staff at PEAK Parent Center has been learning to use their new Drupal website. Aaron has advised Bronwen and her colleagues every step of the way, from proposing solutions in the discovery process to walking Bronwen and her coworkers through specific tasks.

Occasionally, Bronwen encounters small problems due to updates or little glitches with distributions, which is why Aaron has encouraged her to get involved and do some training on Drupal. Unfortunately, most of Bronwen’s time is spent trying to get the website ready to launch, as she’s under pressure from the federal government and her board of directors to deploy the new site. Though Bronwen isn’t working on the technical side of the website, she’s busy populating it with content and making sure that it will be a useful tool for her clients.

“What I haven’t done is specific Drupal training,” said Bronwen. “I know about Lynda and Build A Module, but I’ve only had time to do sessions one-on-one with Aaron, for example, ‘Here’s how to upload content in this template.’

"I have learned a lot on Drupal.org, but it’s been primarily through Aaron sending me a link— for example, he’ll send me links about Red Hen since we’re exploring our CRM options— but I haven’t surfed around it much,” Bronwen added.

Areas For Improvement

Bronwen wishes there was a recommended Drupal 101 section on Drupal.org, something that would help content editors like herself learn to use the CMS better, but for now, she is limited to relying on more educated ambassadors for Drupal to point her in the right direction.

“It’s delicate to recommend vendors,” said Bronwen, "but it seems that the community is really powerful, and is certainly one of the most unique aspects that sets Drupal aside from other CMS options. Even a few vendors recommended by the community, or a recommend Drupal 101 lesson where you can go through it, go off and work in Drupal, and come back and get Drupal 201 would be really valuable for me.

“I know that there are local Drupal meet-ups that happen all over the country” Bronwen added. “[One group we talked with] told us that nonprofits can go to these events and say “I need this or that,” and some hardcore Drupal techie will take the work on pro bono. That was another factor that helped draw us to using Drupal — the availability of the community. It would be useful if there was more information on how to tap into those meetups, perhaps, when they’re happening."

Bronwen knows that the Drupal community is really powerful, and considers it one of the most unique aspects that sets Drupal aside from other CMS options. She is excited by the availability of the Drupal community, and is looking forward to interacting with it and working with them as she continues to run and improve PEAK Parent Center’s website.

Personal blog tags: drupal.org user researchpersona interviews
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