Programming

Google Code Search

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I'm not sure when this came out, but Google now has source code search. These guys never stop amazing me.

So what you need to do now is create a new bookmark in firefox. Point it to: http://www.google.com/codesearch?hl=en&q=+lang:php+%s

Give it a name and in the keyword field, put something like 'phpcode'. Save it.

Now in your address bar, type 'phpcode array_merge' and return.

hook_settings pain

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IMHO, the worst part of Drupal is having to learn the API. The core developers are constantly refactoring the heart of Drupal, which is a good thing overall. But it makes it very difficult for the average developer to keep up with the API. Major version releases prior to 4.7 required a developer to make relatively few changes to his module to make it compatible with the new release. 4.7, on the other hand, requires pretty much a complete rewrite of a given 4.6 module.

One revision control system to rule them all

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The first revision control system I ever used was called RCS. It was the pre-cursor to CVS and stored all revision data locally. It was nifty but very limited and not suited for group development. CVS was the first shared revisioning system I used. It was rock solid, IMHO. But it had a few big problems, like the inability to rename or move files. Everything had to be deleted and re-added. 

Since those days, I've used several other revisioning systems: Perforce, Bitkeeper, Clearcase, Subversion and GIT.

Safely upgrading jQuery in Drupal (6)

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I recently worked on a project which required a updated version of the jQuery library. While there is the jQuery Update module, it only allows you to upgrade Drupal 6 to jQuery 1.3. If you really know what you're doing and want to upgrade beyond that version, you can either hack core or create your own simple module to do it. While hacking core is certainly the easier approach (simply overwriting misc/jquery.js with a newer version), it is very bad practice.

Drupal -vs- DIY

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You say you want to build a website? It must be feature rich, flexible, extensible, powerful, and very web2.0. This is an important site, and you don't want to be locked in to someone else's framework, so you have decided the smartest approach is DIY. You have a small team of very experienced LAMP developers who have track record building successful sites. They've promised to meet your every requirement.

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