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Kristian Polso: How to create Drupal Commerce products programmatically

August 19, 2014 - 10:00pm
Sometimes you just need to get your hands dirty and start adding Drupal Commerce products programmatically. Luckily that is not that hard of an thing to do.

Modules Unraveled: 115 Drupal Core Gittip Team with Jennifer Hodgdon, Bojhan Somers Alex Pott and Cathy Theys - Modules Unraveled Podcast

August 19, 2014 - 9:00pm
Published: Wed, 08/20/14Download this episodeGitTip
  • What is GitTip? How does it work?

  • What is a GitTip team?

Drupal Core GitTip Team
  • How did the Drupal Core team come about? What prompted it’s genesis?

  • Who is the organizer of the Drupal Core team, and who is benefiting from it?
    19 members, Alex and Cathy are administering the group, a couple are on vacation.
    16 others are taking money.

  • On the GitTip page it says your goal is $5,000 US/week. What would that cover?
    Cathy: This week is the first week that we will not be able to fund the modest goal of giving people $64/week. The past few weeks we have been paying out $700. We have now eaten all our balance and have only $350 coming in this week.
    The $5k goal is what a guess at funding 6 people about ¼ time.

  • What have you all been working on lately as a result of this funding?
    Cathy: tips are for work already done, so… I'm not sure. Maybe it motivates future work, or planning to be able to do future work? Jen? Bojhan?
    What has this funding enabled you to do?

Episode Links: GitTip Team PageGitTip MembersDrupal Core Gittip Team FAQBojhan on drupal.orgBojhan on TwitterJennifer on drupal.orgJennifer on TwitterJennifer’s company siteCathy on drupal.orgCathy on TwitterAlex on drupal.orgAlex on TwitterCore Conversation at AmsterdamDrupal.org Working GroupsDries call for many separate companies to hire core developersJennifer’s case for core developers on staff at small shopsAlex Pott hired by Chapter ThreeCathy hired by BlackMeshGittip issue to change how team funds are splitTags: Drupal 8Drupal Coreplanet-drupal

PreviousNext: Drupal 8 Now: PHPUnit tests in Drupal 7

August 19, 2014 - 8:10pm

Drupal 8 comes with built-in support for PHP Unit for unit-testing, the industry standard for unit-tests.

But that doesn't mean you can't use PHP Unit for your testing and CI in Drupal 7, if you structure your code well.

Read on to find out what you need to do to use PHP Unit in Drupal 7.

Phase2: Profiling Drupal Performance with PHPStorm and Xdebug

August 19, 2014 - 12:34pm

Profiling is about measuring the performance of PHP code, at least when we are talking about Drupal and Xdebug. You might need to profile your site or app if you work at a firm where performance is highly scrutinized, or if you are having problems getting a migration to complete. Whatever the reason, if you have been tasked with analyzing the performance of your Drupal codebase, profiling is one great way of doing so. Note that Xdebug’s profiler does not track memory usage. If you want to know more about memory performance tracking you should check out Xdebug’s execution trace features.

Alright then lets get started! 

Whoa there cowboy! First you need to know that the act of profiling your code is itself taking resources to accomplish. The more work your code does, the more information that the profiler stores; file sizes for these logs can get very big very quickly. You have been warned. To get going with profiling Drupal in PHPStorm and Xdebug you need:

To setup your environment, edit your php.ini file and add the following lines:

xdebug.profiler_output_dir=/tmp/profiler/ xdebug.profiler_enable=on xdebug.profiler_trigger=on xdebug.profiler_append=on

Depending on what you are testing and how, you may want to adjust the settings for your site. For instance, if you are using Drush to run a migration, you can’t start the profiler on-demand, and that affects the profiler_trigger setting. For my dev site I used the php.ini config you see above and simply added a URL parameter “XDEBUG_PROFILE=on” to my site’s url; this starts Xdebug profiling from the browser.

To give you an idea of what is possible, lets profile the work required to view a simple Drupal node. To profile the node view I visited http://profiler.loc/node/48581?XDEBUG_PROFILE=on in my browser. I didn’t see any flashing lights or hear bells and whistles, but I should have a binary file that PHPStorm can inspect, located in the path I setup in my php.ini profiler_output_dir directive.

Finally lets look at all of our hard work! In PHPStorm navigate to Tools->Analyze Xdebug Profile Snapshot. Browse to your profiler output directory and you should see at least one cachgrind.out.%p file (%p refers to the process id the script used). Open the file with the largest process id appended to the end of the filename.

We are then greeted with a new tab showing the results of the profiler.

The output shows us the functions called, how many times they were called, and the amount of execution time each function took. Additionally, you can see the hierarchy of all function calls and follow potential bottlenecks down to their roots.

There you have it! Go wild and profile all the things! Just kidding, don’t do that.

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Schedules, BOFS, & Training in Amsterdam

August 19, 2014 - 10:20am

The schedule for DrupalCon Amsterdam is live, which means that you can start planning out every detail of your Amsterdam experience. You can start the hard work of choosing the sessions, BOFs, and social events you want to attend, and build your own schedule right on the DrupalCon Amsterdam site.

BOF scheduling is live

Speaking of BOFs, you don’t have to wait until DrupalCon Amsterdam to claim yours: you can start using the online booking feature today to schedule your BOFs. Be sure you do it soon, though— BOF rooms go fast!

Register for training before 5 September

Lastly, we need more people to register to attend training at DrupalCon Amsterdam. Show us you're interested in these topics! Book before 5 September to make sure the course you want to attend runs. We know it's difficult to make a decision this early out, but classes which do not meet the minimum to run will be cancelled!

The training options are all fantastic and a great opportunity to learn more about Drupal, so register today.

See you in Amsterdam!

Drupalize.Me: Upgrading Drush to work with Drupal 8

August 19, 2014 - 6:00am

When I first started learning Drupal, I remember the process of enabling and disabling modules on the Modules page and it took for-ev-er. My laptop was in serious danger of getting hurled across the room, due to my frustration. Then I discovered drush, and downloading and enabling modules was now performed with ease instead of pain and suffering. Of course there's a lot more you can do with drush than just download and enable modules, this is just one example.

I've been using Drush 6.x on my local machine for quite some time now. Poking around Drupal 8's UI and seeing what's new, I haven't missed drush too much...until it was time to test drive a new contrib module for Drupal 8. When I typed into my Terminal window drush dl page_manager, I got quite the error message:

Drush 6.x only works with Drupal 6 or 7. If I wanted to use Drush on my Drupal 8 site, I would need to upgrade to Drush 7.x.

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Language lessons: What are you translating?

August 19, 2014 - 4:00am
Content (node-level) translation or entity (field-level) translation?

It seems an obvious question to ask, but what are you translating?

The tools exist to translate just about anything in Drupal 7*, but in many different ways, so you need to know exactly what you're translating. Language is 'a first-class citizen', in the sense that any piece of text is inherently written by someone on some language, which Drupal 7 is built to recognise. Sometimes you want to translate each & every individual piece of text (e.g. at the sentence or paragraph level). Other times you want to translate a whole page or section that is made up of multiple pieces of text.

Joachim's blog: Getting Module Builder ready for Drupal 8

August 19, 2014 - 12:12am

I've just made a commit to Module Builder that adds unit tests. This is a big deal, because having these frees me up to start making the big changes that are needed for supporting Drupal 8's new structures: routes, plugins, forms, and so on.

The biggest challenge is going to be the interface. Currently, you give Module Builder just a module name and a list of hook names, and it does the necessary. On the command line it's nice and simple:

drush mb mymodule install schema node_insert form_alter views_data_alter

The first parameter is the module name, and everything that follows is a hook name. Now we add to the mix requests such as a form called MyModuleCakeToppingForm, or an entity type plugin, or a route bake_my_cake and its page controller. How to elegantly specify all that over the command line, without making it horribly unwieldy and impossible to remember how to use?

It's also going to be an interesting exercise in reading my own documentation and seeing how much sense it makes after something like 7 months away from the code.

From what I recall, Module Builder uses a hierarchy of component generators to build your module. Taking our example above, the first thing that happens is that the Module generator class kicks in. 'So, you want a module, do you?' it asks, 'You'll need some of these.' And it begins to assemble a list of further generators, for the components it needs: an info file, and the hooks generator. The hooks generator does the actual job of examining your list of requested hooks, and decides based on that that you need three code files: a .module, a .install, and a .views.inc. So by now we have a tree of generators like this:

- Module -- Info file -- Hooks --- Code file: .module --- Code file: .install --- Code file: .views.inc

This is not a class hierarchy; this is a tree of objects where each generator has a list of the generators beneath it, and is responsible for collecting data from them. Once we have the tree, we iteratively have each generator assemble the data it wants to contribute, starting with the Module generator at the top.

The original plan when I wrote this system was to make the smallest granularity be a file. The leaves of the generator tree would assemble the text for their file's contents, and the Module generator would collect the files up and return them to the caller for output (either in the UI, or to write them directly).

However, while the original intention of this system was that it could be generalised to base components other than modules (so profiles and themes, which are both supported to some extend but lack the UI, see above!), it's also proven to be extendable downwards to smaller components, and to be worthwhile to do so.

Enter the Form generator. Once we have a generic Function generator (and its child class the HookImplementation), we can create a Form generator. Given a form machine name, 'foo_form', it simply knows to add three copies of the Function generator: 'foo_form', 'foo_form_validate', 'foo_form_submit', along with the correct parameters and some boiler plate code.

And we can specialize this further: the AdminSettingsForm simply extends the Form generator, and adds a menu item component, which itself ensures hook_menu() is requested.

At this point it starts to get a bit complicated, as we have components that request other components that are in totally different parts of the component tree. That's the point at which I think I was when I realized I needed tests so that I can refactor and clean up the messy bits of this, and enhance and extend it, without breaking what's already there.

So that's the current state of Module Builder: not yet ready for Drupal 8, but has lots of potential. At this point, I'd really welcome input on the Drush interface, as that's the big quandary. And any input on new Drupal 8 component generators would be great too; there are a few open issues in the queue. And finally, Module Builder is a complex beast; should anyone looking at the code find it baffling and impenetrable, do please file a documentation issue to highlight the problem and request clarification.

Daniel Pocock: Is WebRTC private?

August 18, 2014 - 11:55am

With the exciting developments at rtc.debian.org, many people are starting to look more closely at browser-based real-time communications.

Some have dared to ask: does it solve the privacy problems of existing solutions?

Privacy is a relative term

Perfect privacy and its technical manifestations are hard to define. I had a go at it in a blog on the Gold Standard for free communications technology on 5 June 2013. By pure co-incidence, a few hours later, the first Snowden leaks appeared and this particular human right was suddenly thrust into the spotlight.

WebRTC and ICE privacy risk

WebRTC does not give you perfect privacy.

At least one astute observer at my session at Paris mini-DebConf 2014 questioned the privacy of Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE, RFC 5245).

In its most basic form, ICE scans all the local IP addresses on your machine and NAT gateway and sends them to the person calling you so that their phone can find the optimal path to contact you. This clearly has privacy implications as a caller can work out which ISP you are connected to and some rough details of your network topology at any given moment in time.

What WebRTC does bring to the table

Some of this can be mitigated though: an ICE implementation can be tuned so that it only advertises the IP address of a dedicated relay host. If you can afford a little latency, your privacy is safe again. This privacy protecting initiative could be made by a browser vendor such as Mozilla or it can be done in JavaScript by a softphone such as JSCommunicator.

Many individuals are now using a proprietary softphone to talk to family and friends around the world. The softphone in question has properties like a virus, siphoning away your private information. This proprietary softphone is also an insidious threat to open source and free operating systems on the desktop. WebRTC is a positive step back from the brink. It gives people a choice.

WebRTC is a particularly relevant choice for business. Can you imagine going to a business and asking them to make all their email communication through hotmail? When a business starts using a particular proprietary softphone, how is it any different? WebRTC offers a solution that is actually easier for the user and can be secured back to the business network using TLS.

WebRTC is based on open standards, particularly HTML5. Leading implementations, such as the SIP over WebSocket support in reSIProcate, JSCommunicator and the DruCall module for Drupal are fully open source. Not only is it great to be free, it is possible to extend and customize any of these components.

What is missing

There are some things that are not quite there yet and require a serious effort from the browser vendors. At the top of the list for privacy:

  • ZRTP support - browsers currently support DTLS-SRTP, which is based on X.509. ZRTP is more like PGP, a democratic and distributed peer-to-peer privacy solution without needing to trust some central certificate authority.
  • TLS with PGP - the TLS protocol used to secure the WebSocket signalling channel is also based on X.509 with the risk of a central certificate authority. There is increasing chatter about the need for TLS to use PGP instead of X.509 and WebRTC would be a big winner if this were to eventuate and be combined with ZRTP.

You may think "I'll believe it when I see it". Each of these features, including WebRTC itself, is a piece of the puzzle and even solving one piece at a time brings people further out of danger from the proprietary mess the world lives with today.

Drupal.org Featured Case Studies: Viraland

August 18, 2014 - 10:27am
Completed Drupal site or project URL: http://www.viraland.gr/

Viraland is a Greek online community where you can find the latest viral messages from around the world. Users participate in the community by posting new content and sharing it through social channels. Strange, meaningful and popular messages that go viral are posted daily in Viraland, reflecting the interests of its users.

Key modules/theme/distribution used: ViewsPanelsZenMediaJanrain Social LoginRulesInternationalizationField PermissionsTeam members: highvrahos

SitePoint PHP Drupal: Fine Tuning Drupal Themes with Patterns, Arg and Types

August 18, 2014 - 8:00am

In this article, we’ll discuss how you can leverage various Drupal API functions to achieve more fine grained theming. We’ll cover template preprocessing and alter hooks using path patterns, types and args(). We’ll use the arg() function which returns parts of a current Drupal URL path and some pattern matching for instances when you want […]

Continue reading %Fine Tuning Drupal Themes with Patterns, Arg and Types%

Zivtech: Creating Parallax Scrolling with CSS

August 18, 2014 - 6:58am

Here at Zivtech, we are obsessed with creating immersive experiences for mobile and the web using cutting-edge design and Open Source Software like Drupal and Angular.js. One of the web design techniques that we've had on our radar is Parallax Scrolling, which gives depth to a page by scrolling two dimensions of the site at different rates (for example, text in the front would scroll faster than the image behind it). Parallax Scrolling is most often associated with 2D video game development, but has been becoming more and more prevalent on the web (for some live examples see Creative Bloq's post "46 Great Examples of Parallax Scrolling"). 

While we find this technique engaging, we never adopted it for our designs due to the fact that it relied heavily on Javascript tools and techniques that we found caused performance issues, and especially due to problems with making it work within a responsive web design. However, that may be about to change. In a recent post on his blog, Keith Clark wrote about an exciting new way to create Parallax Scrolling through CSS rather than Javascript, making for more mobile-friendly and responsive Parallax Scrolling effects. Clark writes:

Deferring the parallax effect to CSS removes all these issues and allows the browser to leverage hardware acceleration resulting in almost all the heavy lifting being handled directly by the compositor.

This technique, which removes the bulk of the work off the browser, creates the illusion of 3D without bogging pages down. Now, with CSS, we can maintain the same effect without creating a disjointed experience across multiple platforms. Check out Keith's post on pure CSS parallax scrolling websites for code snippets and samples.

Terms: Drupal PlanetParallax ScrollingCSSJavaScriptDrupalAngular.jsDesignWeb Designresponsive web design

Appnovation Technologies: Different Point of Views

August 18, 2014 - 6:25am

The Drupal Views module is an amazing tool. It certainly has contributed significantly to the widespread adoption of Drupal.

Gábor Hojtsy: Moving Drupal forward at Europe's biggest warm water lake

August 18, 2014 - 6:08am

Drupalaton 2014 was amazing. I got involved pretty late in the organization when we added sprinting capacity on all four days, but I must say doing that was well worth it. While the pre-planned schedule of the event focused on longer full day and half day workshops on business English, automation, rules, commerce, multilingual, etc. the sprint was thriving with backend developer luminaries such as Wim Leers, dawehner, fago, swentel, pfrennsen, dasjo as well as sizable frontend crew such as mortendk, lewisnyman, rteijeiro, emmamaria, etc. This setup allowed us to work on a very wide range of issues.

The list of 70+ issues we worked on shows our work on the drupal.org infrastructure, numerous frontend issues to clean up Drupal's markup, important performance problems, several release critical issues and significant work on all three non-postponed beta blockers at the time.


Drupalers "shipped" from port to port; Photo by TCPhoto

Our coordinated timing with the TCDrupal sprints really helped in working on some of the same issues together. We successfully closed one of the beta blockers shortly after the sprint thanks to coordinated efforts between the two events.

Our list of issues also shows the success of the Rules training on the first day in bringing new people in to porting Rules components, as well as work on other important contributed modules: fixing issues with the Git deploy module's Drupal 8 port and work on the Drupal 8 version of CAPTCHA.

Thanks to the organizers, the sponsors of the event including the Drupal Association Community Cultivation Grants program for enabling us to have some of the most important Drupal developers work together on pressing issues, eat healthy and have fun on the way.

Ps. There is never a lack of opportunity to work with these amazing people. Several days of sprints are coming up around DrupalCon Amsterdam in a little over a month! The weekend sprint locations before/after the DrupalCon days are also really cool! See you there!

Acquia: Drupal Stories Kick Off: My Own Drupal Story

August 18, 2014 - 5:55am

It’s no secret that Drupalists are in high demand. I’ve blogged about the need for training more Drupalers and getting to them earlier in their careers previously, but that’s just one aspect of the greater topic which merits a closer inspection as a cohesive whole.

godel.com.au: Use Behat to track down PHP notices before they take over your Drupal site forever

August 18, 2014 - 5:15am
Mon August 18, 2014 Use Behat to track down PHP notices before they take over your Drupal site forever

Behat is one of the more popular testing frameworks in the Drupal community at the moment, for various reasons. One of these reasons is the useful Behat Drupal Extension that provides a DrupalContext class that can be extended to get a lot of Drupal specific functionality in your FeatureContext right off the bat.

In this post, I'm going to show you how to make Behat aware of any PHP errors that are logged to the watchdog table during each scenario that it runs. In Behat's default setup, a notice or warning level PHP error will not usually break site functionality and so won't fail any tests. Generally though, we want to squash every bug we know about during our QA phase so it would be great to fail any tests that incidentally throw errors along the way.

The main benefits of this technique are:

  • No need to write extra step definitions or modify existing steps, but you'll get some small degree of coverage for all functionality that just happens to be on the same page as whatever you are writing tests for
  • Very simple to implement once you have a working Behat setup with the DrupalContext class and Drupal API driver
  • PHP errors are usually very easy to cleanup if you notice them immediately after introducing them, but not necessarily 6 months later. This is probably the easiest way I've found to nip them in the bud, especially when upgrading contrib modules between minor versions (where it's quite common to find new PHP notices being introduced).
The setup

Once you've configured the Drupal extension for Behat, and set the api_driver to drupal in your behat.yml file, you can use Drupal API functions directly inside your FeatureContext.php file (inside your step definitions).

Conceptually, what we're trying to achieve is pretty straightforward. We want to flush the watchdog table before we run any tests and then fail any scenario that has resulted in one or more PHP messages logged by the end of it. It's also important that we give ourselves enough debugging information to track down errors that we detect. Luckily, watchdog already keeps serlialized PHP error debug information serialized by default, so we can unserlialize what we need and print it straight to the console as required.

You will need to write a custom FeatureContext class extending DrupalContext with hooks for @BeforeSuite and @AfterScenario.

Your @BeforeSuite should look something like this:

<?php /** * @BeforeSuite */ public static function prepare(SuiteEvent $event) { // Clear out anything that might be in the watchdog table from god knows // where. db_truncate('watchdog')->execute(); }

And your corresponding @AfterScenario would look like this:

<?php /** * Run after every scenario. */ public function afterScenario($event) { $log = db_select('watchdog', 'w') ->fields('w') ->condition('w.type', 'php', '=') ->execute() ->fetchAll(); if (!empty($log)) { foreach ($log as $error) { // Make the substitutions easier to read in the log. $error->variables = unserialize($error->variables); print_r($error); } throw new \Exception('PHP errors logged to watchdog in this scenario.'); } }

My apologies, I know this code is a little rough, I'm just using print_r() to spit out the data I'm interested in without even bothering to process the Drupal variable substitutions through format_string(), but hey, it's still legible enough for the average PHP developer and it totally works! Maybe someone else will see this, be inspired, and share a nicer version back here...

David MeisterDirector & lead developerDave is one of the two directors of Godel. He is also our best developer. Dave spends his time improving processes, researching new and shiny techniques and generally working on making Godel the best it can be. Want to work with us?

If you have a project that requires a creative but practical approach...

Get in touch Turn your emails in to actions with ActiveInbox Thu July 31, 2014 Harness email hell with ActiveInbox, which turns your Gmail in to actionable tasks and helps you remind yourself to do the things you said you would.

Deeson Online: Using Grunt, bootstrap, Compass and SASS in a Drupal sub theme

August 17, 2014 - 10:37pm

If you have a separate front end design team from your Drupal developers, you will know that after static pages are moved into a Drupal theme there can be a huge gap in structure between the original files and the final Drupal site.

We wanted to bridge the gap between our theme developers, UX designers, front end coders, and create an all encompassing boilerplate that could be used as a starting point for any project and then easily ported into Drupal.

After thinking about this task for a few weeks it was clear that the best way forward was to use Grunt to automate all of our tasks and create a scalable, well structured sub theme that all of our coders can use to start any project.

What is Grunt?

Grunt is a Javascript task runner that allows you to automate repetitive tasks such as file minifying files, javascript linting, CSS preprocessing, and even reloading your browser.

Just like bootstrap, there are many resources and a vast amount of plugins available for Grunt that can automate any task you could think of, plus it is very easy to write your own, so setting Grunt as a standard for our boilerplate was an easy decision.

The purpose of this post

We use bootstrap in most projects and recently switched to using SASS for CSS preprocessing bundled with Compass, so for the purpose of this tutorial we will create a simple bootstrap sub theme that utilises Grunt & Compass to compile SASS files and automatically reloads our browser every time a file is changed.

You can then take this approach and use the best Grunt plugins that suit your project.

Step 1. Prerequisites

To use Grunt you will need node.js and ruby installed on your system. Open up terminal, and type:

node -v ruby -v

If you don't see a version number, head to the links below to download and install them.

Don’t have node? Download it here

Don’t have ruby? Follow this great tutorial

Step 2. Installing Grunt

Open up terminal, and type:

sudo npm install -g grunt-cli

This will install the command line interface for Grunt. Be patient whilst it is downloading as sometimes it can take a minute or two.

Step 3. Installing Compass and Grunt plugins

Because we want to use the fantastic set of mixins and features bundled with Compass, lets install the Compass and SASS ruby gems.

Open up terminal, and type:

sudo gem install sass sudo gem install compass

For our boilerplate we only wanted to install plugins that we would need in every project, so we kept it simple and limited it to Watch, Compass and SASS to compile all of our files. Our team members can then add extra plugins later in the project as and when needed.

So lets get started and use the node package manager to install our Grunt plugins.

Switch back to Terminal and run the following commands:

sudo npm install grunt-contrib-watch —save-dev sudo npm install grunt-contrib-compass —save-dev sudo npm install grunt-contrib-sass —save-dev Step 4. Creating the boilerplate

Note: For the purposes of this tutorial we are going to use the bootstrap sub theme for our Grunt setup, but the same Grunt setup described below can be used with any Drupal sub theme.

  • Create a new Drupal site
  • Download the bootstrap theme into your sites/all/themes directory
    drush dl bootstrap
  • Copy the bootstrap starter kit (sites/all/themes/bootstrap/bootstrap_subtheme) into your theme directory
  • Rename bootstrap_subtheme.info.starterkit to bootstrap_subtheme.info
  • Navigate to admin/appearance and click “Enable, and set default" for your sub-theme.

Your Drupal site should now be setup with Bootstrap and your folder structure should now look like this:

For more information on creating a bootstrap sub theme check out the community documentation.

Step 5. Switching from LESS to SASS

Our developers liked less, our designers likes SASS, but after a team tech talk explaining the benefits of using SASS with Compass (a collection of mixins with an updater with some cleaver sprite creation), everyone agreed that SASS was the way forward.

Officially Bootstrap is now packaged with SASS, so lets replace our .less files with .scss files in our bootstrap_subtheme so we can utilise all of the mixin goodness that comes with it SASS & Compass.

  • Head over to bootstrap and download the SASS version
  • Copy the stylesheets folder from boostrap-sass/assets/ and paste it into your bootstrap_subtheme
  • Rename the stylesheets folder to bootstrap-sass
  • Create a new folder called custom-sass in bootsrap_subtheme
  • Create a new file in the custom-sass called style.scss
  • Import bootstrap-sass/bootstrap.scss into style.scss

​You should now have the following setup in your sub theme:

We are all set!

Step 6. Setting up Grunt - The package.json & Gruntfile.js

Now lets configure Grunt to run our tasks. Grunt only needs two files to be setup, a package.json file that defines our dependencies and a Gruntfiles.js to configure our plugins.

Within bootstrap_subtheme, create a package.json and add the following code:

{ "name": "bootstrap_subtheme", "version": "1.0.0", "author": “Your Name", "homepage": "http://homepage.com", "engines": { "node": ">= 0.8.0" }, "devDependencies": { "grunt-contrib-compass": "v0.9.0", "grunt-contrib-sass": "v0.7.3", "grunt-contrib-watch": "v0.6.1" } }

In this file you can add whichever plugins are best suited for your project, check out the full list of plugins at the official Grunt site.

Install Grunt dependencies

Next, open up terminal, cd into sites/all/themes/bootstrap_subtheme, and run the following task:

sudo npm install

This command looks through your package.json file and installs the plugins listed. You only have to run this command once when you set up a new Grunt project, or when you add a new plugin to package.json.

Once you run this you will notice a new folder in your bootstrap_subtheme called node_modules which stores all of your plugins. If you are using git or SVN in your project, make sure to ignore this folder.

Now lets configure Grunt to use our plugins and automate some tasks. Within bootstrap_subtheme, create a Gruntfile.js file and add the following code:

module.exports = function (grunt) { grunt.initConfig({ watch: { src: { files: [‘**/*.scss', '**/*.php'], tasks: ['compass:dev'] }, options: { livereload: true, }, }, compass: { dev: { options: { sassDir: 'custom-sass/scss', cssDir: 'css', imagesPath: 'assets/img', noLineComments: false, outputStyle: 'compressed' } } } }); grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-compass'); grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-sass'); grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-watch'); };

This file is pretty straight forward, we configure our watch tasks to look for certain files and reload our browser, and then we define our scss and css directories so that compass knows where to look.

I won’t go into full detail with the options available, but visit the links below to see the documentation:

Watch documentatation

SASS documentatation

 

Step 7. Enabling live reload

Download and enable the livereload module into your new Drupal site. By default, you will have to be logged in as admin for live reload to take effect, but you can change this under Drupal permissions.

Once you enable livereload, refresh your browser window to load the livereload.js library.

Step 8. Running Grunt

We are all set! Head back over to Terminal and check you are in the bootstrap_subtheme directory, then type:

grunt watch

Now every time you edit a scss file, Grunt will compile your SASS into a compressed style.css file and automatically reload your browser.

Give it a go by importing compass into the top of your style folder and changing the body background to be a compass mixin.

@import 'compass'; @import '../bootstrap-sass/bootstrap.scss'; /* * Custom overrides */ body { @include background(linear-gradient(#eee, #fff)); }

To stop Grunt from watching your files, press Ctrl and C simultaneously on your keyboard.

Step 9. Debugging

One common problem you may encounter when using Grunt alongside live reload is the following error message:

Fatal error: Port 35729 is already in use by another process.

This means that the port being used by live reload is currently in use by another process, either by a different grunt project, or an application such as Chrome.

If you experience this problem run the following command and find out which application is using the port.

lsof | grep 35729

Simply close the application and run “grunt watch” again. If the error still persists and all else fails, restart your machine and try to stop Grunt from watching files before moving on to another project.

Next steps…

This is just a starting point on what you can achieve using Grunt to automate your tasks and gives you a quick insight to how we go about starting a project.

Other things to consider:

  • Duplicating the _variables.scss bootstrap file to override the default settings.
  • Adding linted, minified javascript files using the uglify plugin
  • Configure Grunt to automatically validate your markup using the W3C Markup Validator
  • Write your own Grunt plugins to suite your own projects
Let me know your thoughts - you can share your ideas and views in the comments below.

 

Read moreUsing Grunt, bootstrap, Compass and SASS in a Drupal sub themeBy David Allard | 18th August 2014

Victor Kane: Super simple example of local drush alias configuration

August 17, 2014 - 6:12am

So I have a folder for drush scripts _above_ several doc root folders on a dev user's server. And I want to run status or whatever and my own custom drush scripts on _different_ Drupal web app instances. Drush has alias capability for different site instances, so you can do:

$ drush @site1 status

So, how to set up an aliases file?

(I'm on Ubuntu with Drush 6.2.0 installed with PEAR as per this great d.o. doc page Installing Drush on Any Linux Server Out There (Kalamuna people, wouldn't you know it?)).

Careful reading of the excellent drush documentation points you to a Drush Shell Aliases doc page, and from there to the actual example aliases file that comes with every drush installation.

So to be able to run drush commands for a few of my local Drupal instances, I did this:

  • In my Linux user directory, I created the file ~/.drush/aliases.drushrc.php
  • Contents:
<?php $aliases['site1'] = array( 'root' => '/home/thevictor/site1/drupal-yii', 'uri' => 'drupal-yii.example.com', ); $aliases['site2'] = array( 'root' => '/home/thevictor/site2', 'uri' => 'site2.example.com', );

Then I can do, from anywhere as long as I am logged in as that user:

$ cd /tmp
$ drush @site1 status
...
$ drush @site2 status

and lots of other good stuff. Have a nice weekend.

read more

Wesley Tanaka: Fast, Low Memory Drupal 6 System Module

August 15, 2014 - 5:24pm

A Drupal 5 version of this module is also available.  If you would like this patch to be committed to Drupal core, please do not leave a comment on this page—please instead add your comment to Drupal issue #455092.

This is a drop-in replacement for the system.module of Drupal 6.33 which makes your Drupal 6 site use less memory and may even make it faster. A test I ran in a development environment with a stock Drupal 6 installation suggested that I got:

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Appnovation Technologies: Some World-Class Museums Using Drupal

August 15, 2014 - 12:56pm

I love museums and galleries! I love Open Source! I love Drupal! Why not weave them all together into a single, harmonious blog post, I thought….